Bridges and Oceans (well, one ocean)

building bridges

It’s a busy week for Humanities colleagues at Northumbria.  With assessment boards over, we’ve been reviewing the delivery of modules and programmes this academic year and preparing for next.  There are lots of good things to celebrate, including lots of great achievements by students and staff, and we have lots of good ideas for next year.

Tomorrow, we have two important events happening on campus.

First, we are being visited by school subject leaders and teachers of English and History for our Building Bridges day.  We will spend the day discussing some of of our teaching and other activities and exploring ways we can work together to develop resources and activities to support teaching and project work.

One focus of the day will, of course, be how things have changed recently, including the effects of GCSE and A Level reforms.

lynnemurphygallery

After that, Lynne Murphy will be giving the Northumbria Annual Linguistics Lecture, exploring differences between British and American English.  Bookings for this quickly got close to our initial capacity so we adapted things so we can accommodate a bigger audience. It’s not too late to book a place:

Separated by a Common Language? Northumbria Annual Linguistics Lecture

We’ll tell you more about how things go after tomorrow

Separated By A Common Language?

lynnemurphygallery

We are delighted to announce that Professor Lynne Murphy, from the University of Sussex  will be delivering the Northumbria Annual Linguistics Lecture on our city campus at 6pm on Wednesday the 20th of June.

Lynne is a very engaging speaker and this will be a fun and fascinating talk.

The event is free and open to all. Places are limited so book here to make sure you reserve a place:

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/northumbria-annual-linguistics-lecture-2018-tickets-45985097665

Time and date: 6pm, 20 June 2018

Location: Lipman Lecture Theatre (Lipman 031), Lipman Building, Northumbria University, Newcastle upon Tyne NE1 8ST

Directions and campus map: https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/about-us/our-campuses/newcastle-city-campus/

Title: Separated by a Common Language? the complicated relationship between American & British English

Summary:

When faced with British English, Americans are apt to be impressed and are often made a bit insecure about their own linguistic abilities. When thinking about American English, Britons often express dismissiveness or fear. This has been going on for nearly 300 years, developing into a complex mythology of British–American linguistic relations.

This talk looks into the current state of the “special relationship” between the two national standards. How did we get to the point that the BBC publishes headlines like “How Americanisms are killing the English language” while Americans tweet “Everything sounds better in a British accent”? The answer is in a broad set of problematic beliefs. We’ll look at how different the two national Englishes are (and why they’re not more different), why neither has claim to being older than the other, and why technology isn’t making us all speak or write the same English.

About Lynne:

Lynne Murphy is Professor of Linguistics at the University of Sussex in Brighton, England. Since 2006, her alter ego Lynneguist has written the Separated by a Common Language blog. There, she reflects on UK–US linguistic differences from the perspective of an American linguist in England, while fighting the good fight against linguistic myths and prejudice. She continues that fight in The Prodigal Tongue: The Love–Hate Relationship between British and American English (Oneworld, 2018).

Queries and further information: If you have any questions about the event, please contact Billy Clark: billy.clark@northumbria.ac.uk

Building Bridges 2018

Booking is now open for our free event for teachers of History, English Language, Literature and Creative Writing at our City Campus East on the 20th of June.

We will discuss recent curriculum changes, explore ways for school and university students and teachers to work together, and offer and discuss resources for teachers to use in delivering content at Key Stages 4 and 5.

There is further information and booking form here:

https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/about-us/academic-departments/humanities/study/building-bridges—humanities-conference/

Book early to make sure you don’t miss out!

 

From Shakespeare’s Stage to the Digital Page: Why Study English Literature at Degree Level?

Katy Shaw, our Professor of Contemporary Writings, has written an article for the UK English Media Centre about the many reasons why an English Literature degree is a great choice for for graduates of the future. Read it here:

https://www.englishandmedia.co.uk/blog/from-shakespeares-stage-to-the-digital-page-why-study-english-literature

shakespeareipad

Hauntology

There are many excited readers this week as they have been receiving their pre-order copies of Hauntology, the new book by our colleague Professor Katy Shaw

Katy is Professor of English Literature at Northumbria and a leading figure in work on 21st century writing, working class literature, representations of post-industrial regeneration, and the languages of comedy.

As its subtitle says, this book explores ‘the presence of the past in contemporary literature’. We can’t wait to see what it says about the work of Simon Armitage, Jez Butterworth, Zadie Smith, David Peace and others.

The book is dedicated to Mark Fisher, a key name in work on hauntology and other areas of criticism.