Bodyworks: a conference on corporeal representation

Here is information on a fascinating conference taking place at Northumbria today.

. . .

BodyWorks: A Conference on Corporeal Representation at the University of Northumbriabodyworks

Date of Event
3rd May 2018
Last Booking Date for this Event
3rd May 2018
Description
A one day conference with a keynote lecture by Professor Lisa Blackman. Aimed primarily at postgraduates (Masters, PhDs, early career Postdocs) but open to anyone who is interested in affect studies, feminist and queer theory, body studies and emotion studies.

Professor Lisa Blackman from Goldsmith’s University is one of the most prominent scholars in the fields of body studies, affect studies and post-humanism at the moment. Professor Blackman’s work intersects body studies with media and cultural theory. She has written extensively on subjectivity, affect, the body and embodiment, including her most recent monograph Immaterial Bodies: Affect, Embodiment, Mediation (2012).

BodyWorks takes an interdisciplinary and intersectional approach to representations of bodies, embodiment and sensory experience across literature and culture. In doing so, we welcome responses from a range of disciplines, including cultural studies, literary studies, philosophy, arts, history, education, media, social sciences and medical humanities. Through this breadth of intellectual inquiry, the event aims to draw together a range of approaches and methodologies for exploring various facets of the contemporary shift towards studies of the body and emotions in the humanities.

Date – 3rd May 2018

Times – 8.30am (registration) until 6.15pm. (There will also be the option of attending a conference dinner at 7pm, for which there will be an additional charge).

Location – Northumbria University, Ellison Building, Block E.

Email address for enquiries –  bodyworks.nu@gmail.com

Cost – £10

For a campus map, please click here:

https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/media/738539/citycampus_map.pdf

English Colleagues in The Conversation

We’ve had several pieces by colleagues in English in The Conversation over the years. Here are three recent examples.

Sarah Duffy’s piece on how our minds construct time appeared in January

Katy Shaw argued against Will Self’s views on the future of the novel in March

Most recently, Billy Clark, Sarah Duffy and Graham Hall wrote a piece on how to talk about politics with your family

Billy appeared on CJAD 800 in Montreal yesterday to talk about the ideas in the piece he wrote with Sarah and Graham.

All of these pieces relate to ideas we discuss in classroom work and in our own research.

We’d be happy to join in further conversations on these here or elsewhere!

 

 

 

Writers and Intellectuals on Britain and Europe, 1918-2018

We are very much looking forward to this international conference which will be hosted by Northumbria University on the 1st and 2nd of November 2018.

The conference will bring together creative writers and researcher in literary and cultural studies with an interest in Britain and Europe to explore questions about Britain’s relationship with Europe and the place of writers and intellectuals in defining it.

There is already an impressive list of confirmed speakers:

  • Professor Tanja BUELTMANN (Northumbria University)
  • Dr Katie COOPER (University of East Anglia)
  • Professor Robert EAGLESTONE (Royal Holloway, University of London), editor of Brexit and Literature: Critical and Cultural Responses(2018)
  • Professor Ina HABERMANN (Universität Basel)
  • Professor Jason HARDING (University of Durham)
  • Professor Barbara KORTE (Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg)
  • Professor Christian MAIR (Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg)
  • Professor Gill PLAIN (University of St Andrews)
  • Dr Petra RAU (University of East Anglia)
  • Dr Laura LOJO RODRIGUEZ (Universidade de Santiago de Compostela)
  • Dr Fiona SHAW (Northumbria University), author of young-adult ‘BrexLit’ novel Outwalkers(2018)

You can find the call for papers and further information here:

https://europeanconversations.com/call-for-papers/

Muriel Spark’s Voices

murielsparkWe are looking forward to our next English Literature & Creative Writing research seminar.

Professor Pat Waugh from Durham University will give a talk entitled:

‘Muriel Spark’s Voices and the Spaces of Composition’

Professor Waugh’s talk will look at how Spark models her own idea of voice/writing out of an eclectic mix of sources, from Greek and Hebrew works to Romantic and modernist ones, and on her own experience of voice hearing.

Given that 2018 is Spark’s centenary year, this talk is as topical as it is going to be enjoyable.

The talk will take place at 4-5.30pm on Wednesday 21st March in Room 301 of the Sandyford Building on our City Campus.

You can find directions to the campus here:

Directions to Northumbria University

And a City Campus map here:

Northumbria University City Campus map

All welcome.

Please contact Ann-Marie Einhaus if you have any queries: ann-marie.einhaus@northumbria.ac.uk

 

 

 

Pragmatics, Literature and ‘half-formed things’

agirlisahalfformedcover       Billy Trondheim wee

Our next English Language research seminar will be given by me (Billy Clark). I’ll be talking about Eimear McBride’s novel A Girl Is A Half-formed Thing and how recent developments in pragmatics can help to account for varying responses to it. There’s an abstract below.

The talk will take place at 2-3.30pm on Tuesday 20th March in Room 303 of the Lipman Building on our City Campus.

You can find directions to the campus here:

Directions to Northumbria University

And a City Campus map here:

Northumbria University City Campus map

All welcome.

Contact me if you have any queries: billy.clark@northumbria.ac.uk

Abstract:

This talk explores some of the ways in which ideas from pragmatics can help us to understand the production, interpretation and evaluation of literary texts. It presents some recent developments in work on (relevance-theoretic) pragmatics and considers some ways in which these can contribute to fuller accounts of literary texts. focusing in particular on Eimear McBride’s novel A Girl Is A Half-formed Thing.

 The recent developments discussed here aim to take fuller account of the extensiveness, complexity, open-endedness and indeterminacy of interpretation processes. They also take fuller account of the role of nonverbal phenomena in communication. For example, a one-word utterance ‘yeah’ is often unlikely to be taken to indicate agreement if uttered with falling intonation and if the speaker does not also nod her head. The paper argues that these ideas help us to understand varying responses to Eimear McBride’s novel.

Some responses to McBride’s novel have been very positive. Some have been quite negative. Many readers report an initial negative response being replaced by a positive one. Caitlin Moran, one of the judges who awarded the book the 2014 Bailey’s prize, and the novelist Elizabeth McCracken have both reported that a negative response as they began reading the book was replaced by a more positive one. Moran said, ‘ten pages in and all the bells start ringing’. McCracken said, ‘. . . about halfway down the second page, my brain figured it out and the book had me.’ This talk considers how the minds of readers with positive and negative evaluations differ as they read the book. It argues that positive responses typically involve readers failing to carry out pragmatic processes which they would usually make when reading. The processes of these readers are simultaneously more complex than and simpler than those of readers who give up on the book and decide the effects they derive from reading it will not justify the effort involved.