Separated By A Common Language?

lynnemurphygallery

We are delighted to announce that Professor Lynne Murphy, from the University of Sussex  will be delivering the Northumbria Annual Linguistics Lecture on our city campus at 6pm on Wednesday the 20th of June.

Lynne is a very engaging speaker and this will be a fun and fascinating talk.

The event is free and open to all. Places are limited so book here to make sure you reserve a place:

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/northumbria-annual-linguistics-lecture-2018-tickets-45985097665

Time and date: 6pm, 20 June 2018

Location: Lipman Lecture Theatre (Lipman 031), Lipman Building, Northumbria University, Newcastle upon Tyne NE1 8ST

Directions and campus map: https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/about-us/our-campuses/newcastle-city-campus/

Title: Separated by a Common Language? the complicated relationship between American & British English

Summary:

When faced with British English, Americans are apt to be impressed and are often made a bit insecure about their own linguistic abilities. When thinking about American English, Britons often express dismissiveness or fear. This has been going on for nearly 300 years, developing into a complex mythology of British–American linguistic relations.

This talk looks into the current state of the “special relationship” between the two national standards. How did we get to the point that the BBC publishes headlines like “How Americanisms are killing the English language” while Americans tweet “Everything sounds better in a British accent”? The answer is in a broad set of problematic beliefs. We’ll look at how different the two national Englishes are (and why they’re not more different), why neither has claim to being older than the other, and why technology isn’t making us all speak or write the same English.

About Lynne:

Lynne Murphy is Professor of Linguistics at the University of Sussex in Brighton, England. Since 2006, her alter ego Lynneguist has written the Separated by a Common Language blog. There, she reflects on UK–US linguistic differences from the perspective of an American linguist in England, while fighting the good fight against linguistic myths and prejudice. She continues that fight in The Prodigal Tongue: The Love–Hate Relationship between British and American English (Oneworld, 2018).

Queries and further information: If you have any questions about the event, please contact Billy Clark: billy.clark@northumbria.ac.uk

Lisa Matthews – Launch of Callisto

LisaMatthews

Northumbria Creative Writing PhD student Lisa Matthews launches her new collection of prose poems Callisto in June. The Newcastle launch takes place at the Lit & Phil on Wednesday 13th June, 7-9pm. Lisa will be reading from the book, with support from Gillian Allnutt, Linda France, Crista Ermiya and Jo Colley. She will also be attempting an audience recitation of one of the poems from the book. All welcome.

Building Bridges 2018

Booking is now open for our free event for teachers of History, English Language, Literature and Creative Writing at our City Campus East on the 20th of June.

We will discuss recent curriculum changes, explore ways for school and university students and teachers to work together, and offer and discuss resources for teachers to use in delivering content at Key Stages 4 and 5.

There is further information and booking form here:

https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/about-us/academic-departments/humanities/study/building-bridges—humanities-conference/

Book early to make sure you don’t miss out!

 

From Shakespeare’s Stage to the Digital Page: Why Study English Literature at Degree Level?

Katy Shaw, our Professor of Contemporary Writings, has written an article for the UK English Media Centre about the many reasons why an English Literature degree is a great choice for for graduates of the future. Read it here:

https://www.englishandmedia.co.uk/blog/from-shakespeares-stage-to-the-digital-page-why-study-english-literature

shakespeareipad

Hauntology

There are many excited readers this week as they have been receiving their pre-order copies of Hauntology, the new book by our colleague Professor Katy Shaw

Katy is Professor of English Literature at Northumbria and a leading figure in work on 21st century writing, working class literature, representations of post-industrial regeneration, and the languages of comedy.

As its subtitle says, this book explores ‘the presence of the past in contemporary literature’. We can’t wait to see what it says about the work of Simon Armitage, Jez Butterworth, Zadie Smith, David Peace and others.

The book is dedicated to Mark Fisher, a key name in work on hauntology and other areas of criticism.

 

 

 

Bodyworks: a conference on corporeal representation

Here is information on a fascinating conference taking place at Northumbria today.

. . .

BodyWorks: A Conference on Corporeal Representation at the University of Northumbriabodyworks

Date of Event
3rd May 2018
Last Booking Date for this Event
3rd May 2018
Description
A one day conference with a keynote lecture by Professor Lisa Blackman. Aimed primarily at postgraduates (Masters, PhDs, early career Postdocs) but open to anyone who is interested in affect studies, feminist and queer theory, body studies and emotion studies.

Professor Lisa Blackman from Goldsmith’s University is one of the most prominent scholars in the fields of body studies, affect studies and post-humanism at the moment. Professor Blackman’s work intersects body studies with media and cultural theory. She has written extensively on subjectivity, affect, the body and embodiment, including her most recent monograph Immaterial Bodies: Affect, Embodiment, Mediation (2012).

BodyWorks takes an interdisciplinary and intersectional approach to representations of bodies, embodiment and sensory experience across literature and culture. In doing so, we welcome responses from a range of disciplines, including cultural studies, literary studies, philosophy, arts, history, education, media, social sciences and medical humanities. Through this breadth of intellectual inquiry, the event aims to draw together a range of approaches and methodologies for exploring various facets of the contemporary shift towards studies of the body and emotions in the humanities.

Date – 3rd May 2018

Times – 8.30am (registration) until 6.15pm. (There will also be the option of attending a conference dinner at 7pm, for which there will be an additional charge).

Location – Northumbria University, Ellison Building, Block E.

Email address for enquiries –  bodyworks.nu@gmail.com

Cost – £10

For a campus map, please click here:

https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/media/738539/citycampus_map.pdf

English Colleagues in The Conversation

We’ve had several pieces by colleagues in English in The Conversation over the years. Here are three recent examples.

Sarah Duffy’s piece on how our minds construct time appeared in January

Katy Shaw argued against Will Self’s views on the future of the novel in March

Most recently, Billy Clark, Sarah Duffy and Graham Hall wrote a piece on how to talk about politics with your family

Billy appeared on CJAD 800 in Montreal yesterday to talk about the ideas in the piece he wrote with Sarah and Graham.

All of these pieces relate to ideas we discuss in classroom work and in our own research.

We’d be happy to join in further conversations on these here or elsewhere!