Explaining Metonymy

We are looking forward to next week’s online Institute of Humanities research seminar.

Deirdre Wilson (University College London and Centre for the Study of Nature and Mind, Oslo) will be talking on ‘Explaining Metonymy’.

Deirdre is a leading figure in pragmatics and cognitive science. She is a co-founder, with Dan Sperber, of relevance theory, a very influential approach to cognition and communication which has since been applied in a wide range of areas.

The talk is at 16.10 UK time on Wednesday 17th of March.

All welcome.

Email billy.clark@northumbria.ac.uk for the link to join.

Here is an abstract for the talk:

Abstract

For two thousand years, figurative utterances such as metaphor, irony and metonymy have been seen as violations of a pragmatic rule, norm, or maxim of literal, plain speaking, and analysed in terms of arbitrary ‘transfer of meaning’ rules (e.g. ‘In irony, the literal meaning is replaced by its opposite’, ‘In metaphor, the literal meaning is replaced by a related simile or comparison’, or ‘In metonymy, the literal meaning is replaced by an associated attribute or adjunct’). Recently, attempts have been made to provide more explanatory accounts which shed light on why the same types of figurative utterances should arise in culture after culture. While some progress has been made with metaphor and irony, metonymy continues to present a serious challenge. Why should a rational speaker of (1)-(3) expect to be understood as referring to a patient, a customer or a group of people rather than a disease, a dish or a building, respectively, without the aid of arbitrary ‘transfer of meaning’ rules?

(1)       The appendicitis in bed 3 is threatening to write to the newspapers

(2)       Can you take the pepperoni pizza his glass of wine?

(3)       Buckingham Palace is refusing to comment.

In this talk, I will outline a new approach to metonymy (developed jointly with Ingrid Lossius Falkum) which may help to meet this challenge. On this approach, metonymy is a type of neologism, or word coinage, and is understood in exactly the same way as other types of word coinage, needing no special ‘transfer of meaning’ rules or mechanisms.

Language and Linguistics Seminars at Northumbria

Please note: this list has been updated following the postponement of talks on the 23rd of April and 19th of May

We have an exciting line-up in our Language and Linguistics research seminar series this semester.

Like many others, we’ve been enjoying the opportunity to join seminars online and to welcome online visitors to our events this year.

All are welcome to these.

Email billy.clark@northumbria.ac.uk for more information.

We’ll let you know if there any additions to the programme,


Northumbria Language and Linguistics Research Seminars Semester 2 2020-2021

12/03/2021 – 16:00-17:00
Sarah Kelly – University College Dublin    
“Examining the linguistic properties of threatening communications”  

Click here to join the meeting 

17/03/2021 – 16:10-17:30 – Joint seminar with the Institute of Humanities
Deirdre Wilson – University College London
“Explaining Metonymy”  

Click here to join the meeting 

POSTPONED: 23/04/2021 – 16:00-16:45
Sameeha Al Ahmadi – Northumbria University
“The Effect of Gender on the Nativisation and Lexical Density of Tweets by Saudi Bloggers: A Corpus Based Study “ 

Click here to join the meeting 

30/04/2021 – 16:00-17:10
Kingsley Ugwuanyi  – Northumbria University
“Linguistic ownership among speakers of Nigerian English”, 

Judith Taylor – Northumbria University
“Evaluations, impressions, and affiliations; measuring language regard amongst gen-Z Geordies” 

Click here to join the meeting 

07/05/2021 – 16:00-17:00
Sarah Duffy – Northumbria University
“Winter is coming… or are we coming up to winter? An exploration of two contrasting perspectives on time”  

Click here to join the meeting 

POSTPONED: 19/05/2021 – 16:10-17:30  – Joint seminar with Institute of Humanities
Louise Pybus – Northumbria University
“Language, identity and the school curriculum: challenges and opportunities for students with EAL in rural secondary school contexts” 

14th Newcastle and Northumbria PG Conference in Linguistics

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Call for Papers

The abstract submission for the 14th Newcastle Northumbria Postgraduate Conference in Linguistics is now open.

This one-day conference will provide an opportunity for linguistics postgraduates to present and discuss their research in an informal and intellectually stimulating setting. The conference will be held on Thursday the 2nd of April 2020.

Submission Guidelines

We would like to invite linguistics postgraduates from all research areas of linguistics, both theoretical and applied, from any institution to submit abstracts for oral and poster presentations.

 

The following submission link leads to an external website, EasyChair. You need to register on EasyChair to be able to submit your abstract.

Submissions link

SUBMIT YOUR ABSTRACT HERE

Abstracts should be no more than 500 words long and a maximum of 1 A4 page of text. References, glossed/transcribed examples, and images can appear on a second page and do not count toward the word limit. Abstracts should be submitted as PDF documents (.pdf) and be fully anonymised, including metadata. All submissions will be anonymously reviewed. Authors may submit a maximum of two abstracts, only one of which may be sole-/first-authored. Acceptance will be conditional on at least one of the authors registering for the conference.

 

Key dates

Abstract submission deadline: 7th February 2020

Extended submission deadline: 10th February 2020

Notification of acceptance: 6th March 2020

Conference registration deadline: 20th March 2020

Contact

Please email general queries to nnpcil@newcastle.ac.uk. If you are having problems with the Easy Chair link please email j.belur-rajeev2@newcastle.com.

Please visit the website for further information:

14th Newcastle & Northumbria Postgraduate Conference in Linguistics

BAAL Conference 2020 at Northumbria University

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We are delighted to be hosting the 2020 BAAL Conference at Northumbria University from the 3rd to the 5th of September 2020.

Further information, including a link for registration, will appear here soon.

Conference Theme: “Challenges and Opportunities in Applied Linguistics”

Plenary Speakers

Pit Corder Lecture

About the Venue

Situated in the North East of England, Northumbria University’s City Campus is located in the centre of Newcastle upon Tyne.

For more information on the university and travel directions click here