14th Newcastle and Northumbria PG Conference in Linguistics

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Call for Papers

The abstract submission for the 14th Newcastle Northumbria Postgraduate Conference in Linguistics is now open.

This one-day conference will provide an opportunity for linguistics postgraduates to present and discuss their research in an informal and intellectually stimulating setting. The conference will be held on Thursday the 2nd of April 2020.

Submission Guidelines

We would like to invite linguistics postgraduates from all research areas of linguistics, both theoretical and applied, from any institution to submit abstracts for oral and poster presentations.

 

The following submission link leads to an external website, EasyChair. You need to register on EasyChair to be able to submit your abstract.

Submissions link

SUBMIT YOUR ABSTRACT HERE

Abstracts should be no more than 500 words long and a maximum of 1 A4 page of text. References, glossed/transcribed examples, and images can appear on a second page and do not count toward the word limit. Abstracts should be submitted as PDF documents (.pdf) and be fully anonymised, including metadata. All submissions will be anonymously reviewed. Authors may submit a maximum of two abstracts, only one of which may be sole-/first-authored. Acceptance will be conditional on at least one of the authors registering for the conference.

 

Key dates

Abstract submission deadline: 7th February 2020

Extended submission deadline: 10th February 2020

Notification of acceptance: 6th March 2020

Conference registration deadline: 20th March 2020

Contact

Please email general queries to nnpcil@newcastle.ac.uk. If you are having problems with the Easy Chair link please email j.belur-rajeev2@newcastle.com.

Please visit the website for further information:

14th Newcastle & Northumbria Postgraduate Conference in Linguistics

Separated By A Common Language?

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We are delighted to announce that Professor Lynne Murphy, from the University of Sussex  will be delivering the Northumbria Annual Linguistics Lecture on our city campus at 6pm on Wednesday the 20th of June.

Lynne is a very engaging speaker and this will be a fun and fascinating talk.

The event is free and open to all. Places are limited so book here to make sure you reserve a place:

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/northumbria-annual-linguistics-lecture-2018-tickets-45985097665

Time and date: 6pm, 20 June 2018

Location: Lipman Lecture Theatre (Lipman 031), Lipman Building, Northumbria University, Newcastle upon Tyne NE1 8ST

Directions and campus map: https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/about-us/our-campuses/newcastle-city-campus/

Title: Separated by a Common Language? the complicated relationship between American & British English

Summary:

When faced with British English, Americans are apt to be impressed and are often made a bit insecure about their own linguistic abilities. When thinking about American English, Britons often express dismissiveness or fear. This has been going on for nearly 300 years, developing into a complex mythology of British–American linguistic relations.

This talk looks into the current state of the “special relationship” between the two national standards. How did we get to the point that the BBC publishes headlines like “How Americanisms are killing the English language” while Americans tweet “Everything sounds better in a British accent”? The answer is in a broad set of problematic beliefs. We’ll look at how different the two national Englishes are (and why they’re not more different), why neither has claim to being older than the other, and why technology isn’t making us all speak or write the same English.

About Lynne:

Lynne Murphy is Professor of Linguistics at the University of Sussex in Brighton, England. Since 2006, her alter ego Lynneguist has written the Separated by a Common Language blog. There, she reflects on UK–US linguistic differences from the perspective of an American linguist in England, while fighting the good fight against linguistic myths and prejudice. She continues that fight in The Prodigal Tongue: The Love–Hate Relationship between British and American English (Oneworld, 2018).

Queries and further information: If you have any questions about the event, please contact Billy Clark: billy.clark@northumbria.ac.uk