Language, gender and sexism in the House of Commons

 

We are delighted that the next speaker in our Linguistics Research Seminar series at Northumbria will be Dr. Sylvia Shaw, from the University of Westminster.

Sylvia is a leading researcher on language, gender and politics. She has carried out influential research on language and gender in the house of commons (the focus of this talk) and in the devolved political institutions of the UK.

Her co-authored book with Deborah Cameron, Gender, Power and Political Speech, focused on the language of political leaders in the 2015 UK General Election (which makes it essential reading right now).

Her monograph Women, Language and Politics will be published by Cambridge University Press in 2020.

The title of Sylvia’s talk is:

“I meant no harm, Mr. Speaker”: Language, gender and sexism in the house of commons

The talk takes place at 2pm in room 121 in the Lipman Building.

The talk is open to all. We look forward to welcoming visitors and discussing Sylvia’s work.

You can find directions and a campus map herehttps://www.northumbria.ac.uk/about-us/our-campuses/newcastle-city-campus/

If you have any questions about the event, please contact Billy Clark: billy.clark@northumbria.ac.uk

Sociolinguistics and Social Change

We’re delighted to welcome Julia Snell to Northumbria on the 30th of October.

Julia is a leading researcher on a wide range of topics, including children’s language variation, classroom discourse and dialogic pedagogy.

You can find out more about her wide range of projects on Julia’s website at the University of Leeds and about her work with Adam Lefstein on dialogic pedagogy at their Dialogic Pedagogy website

The title of Julia’s talk is:

‘Can sociolinguistic research bring about social change? Addressing critiques of sociolinguistic advocacy’

The talk takes place at 12 noon in room 332 in Lipman Building.

The talk is open to all. We look forward to welcoming visitors and discussing Julia’s work.

You can find directions and a campus map herehttps://www.northumbria.ac.uk/about-us/our-campuses/newcastle-city-campus/

If you have any questions about the event, please contact Billy Clark: billy.clark@northumbria.ac.uk

 

 

 

Language, identity and why we shouldn’t be so quick to judge

We are delighted to announce that this year’s Annual Linguistics Lecture will be delivered by Rob Drummond, from Manchester Metropolitan University, on our city campus at 6pm on Thursday the 20th of June.

Rob is an excellent and very engaging speaker. This is guaranteed to be a fun and fascinating talk for anyone interested is language and how the way we speak affects how we understand each other.

The event is free and open to all. Places are limited so book here to make sure you reserve a place:

Eventbrite event page

Time and date: 6pm, 20 June 2019

Location: Lipman Lecture Theatre (Lipman 031), Lipman Building, Northumbria University, Newcastle upon Tyne NE1 8ST

Directions and campus map: https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/about-us/our-campuses/newcastle-city-campus/

Title: Language, identity and why we shouldn’t be so quick to judge

Summary:

Language plays a vital role in making us who we are, certainly in terms of how we are perceived by others. The way we speak provides insights into our social background, proudly announcing some characteristics, and subtly hinting at others. But how much control do we have over the way our speech portrays us? Does our spoken language simply reflect our identities, or does it somehow create them?

This talk explores these questions by drawing on examples from research and from everyday life. It demonstrates the strength of the relationship between language and identity, and highlights how our judgements of others are often led by language. It then asks how fair these judgements are, and whether they say more about us than they do about the person being judged.

RobDrummond_ManchesterVoices

About Rob:

Rob Drummond is Senior Lecturer in Linguistics, and Head of Youth Language at the Manchester Centre for Youth Studies, both at Manchester Metropolitan University. He teaches, researches, and writes about issues to do with language and identity, specialising in the language of young people. His current research project, Manchester Voices, explores the accents, dialects and identities of people across Greater Manchester. Prior to that he worked with young people who had been excluded from mainstream school, and investigated their use of Multicultural Urban British English. Rob regularly appears on television and radio talking about language-related issues, from linguistic pedantry, to politicians’ accents, to language discrimination.

He has published widely, including the books Researching Urban Youth Language and Identity (Palgrave Macmillan 2018) and (with Dan Clayton) Language Diversity and World Englishes (Cambridge University Press, 2018).

Find out more at his personal and university websites:

https://www.robdrummond.co.uk

https://www2.mmu.ac.uk/languages/staff/profile/index.php?id=176

Queries and further information: If you have any questions about the event, please contact Billy Clark: billy.clark@northumbria.ac.uk

Exploring English Language at Northumbria

Exploring English Language: A study day at Northumbria University

Northumbria University City Campus

23 January 2019

9.30am to 4.30pm

If you are exploring aspects of English Language at school and would like to find out more about how they are studied at university, come along to spend a day working with leading experts on English Language at Northumbria University.

The topics we will explore include aspects of:

sociolinguistics

forensic linguistics

language meaning

language change

as well as some insights on what it is like to study English Language at university.

The event takes place in the Great Hall, Sutherland Building, on our City Campus in the centre of Newcastle on the 23rd of January 2019 and runs from 9.30am to 4.30pm.

Each session will include interactive tasks and space for questions and discussion.

Our speakers include:

Billy Clark

Nicci MacLeod

Robert McKenzie

Phillip Wallage

The event is free but places are limited so please book early by emailing:

billy.clark@northumbria.ac.uk

 

 

 

Where Does The Glottal Stop Start?

jennifersmith

We are very much looking forward to our next Institute of Humanities Research Seminar, which will be delivered on Wednesday 21st November by Professor Jennifer Smith, from the University of Glasgow.

Her talk title is:

Where does the Glottal Stop Start? Community, Caregiver and Child in the Rapid Rise of an Iconic British Variable.

Jennifer is a world-leading researcher in sociolinguistics and on language variation and change. Her projects include very significant work on dialects of Scotland and also on the their relationship to colonial varieties of North America. She also leads the AHRC-funded Scots Syntax Atlas project.

This is sure to be a fascinating talk. It takes place at 4pm in room 121 of the Lipman Building. All welcome.

There is a campus map and directions to the campus here:

https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/contact-us/

Here are links to further information on our Humanities research seminars and other Humanities research events