Exploring English Language at Northumbria

Exploring English Language: A study day at Northumbria University

Northumbria University City Campus

23 January 2019

9.30am to 4.30pm

If you are exploring aspects of English Language at school and would like to find out more about how they are studied at university, come along to spend a day working with leading experts on English Language at Northumbria University.

The topics we will explore include aspects of:

sociolinguistics

forensic linguistics

language meaning

language change

as well as some insights on what it is like to study English Language at university.

The event takes place in the Great Hall, Sutherland Building, on our City Campus in the centre of Newcastle on the 23rd of January 2019 and runs from 9.30am to 4.30pm.

Each session will include interactive tasks and space for questions and discussion.

Our speakers include:

Billy Clark

Nicci MacLeod

Robert McKenzie

Phillip Wallage

The event is free but places are limited so please book early by emailing:

billy.clark@northumbria.ac.uk

 

 

 

Where Does The Glottal Stop Start?

jennifersmith

We are very much looking forward to our next Institute of Humanities Research Seminar, which will be delivered on Wednesday 21st November by Professor Jennifer Smith, from the University of Glasgow.

Her talk title is:

Where does the Glottal Stop Start? Community, Caregiver and Child in the Rapid Rise of an Iconic British Variable.

Jennifer is a world-leading researcher in sociolinguistics and on language variation and change. Her projects include very significant work on dialects of Scotland and also on the their relationship to colonial varieties of North America. She also leads the AHRC-funded Scots Syntax Atlas project.

This is sure to be a fascinating talk. It takes place at 4pm in room 121 of the Lipman Building. All welcome.

There is a campus map and directions to the campus here:

https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/contact-us/

Here are links to further information on our Humanities research seminars and other Humanities research events